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Broadcasters

Whether you broadcast a TV or cable TV show that includes music in some of the programming, or operate a terrestrial, satellite or online radio station that broadcasts music, getting Licensed To Play by SOCAN means that the people who created that music are compensated for your use of their work. You’re also making sure that the music used to build your viewership or listenership is used fairly, legally and ethically. The license fees that broadcasters pay to SOCAN for the public performance of music – whether via cue sheets for individual music performances or blanket licenses for all music performances within a given time period – compensate songwriters, composers and music publishers that make up SOCAN.

Question

What is a SOCAN license?

A.

A SOCAN license gives your business or organization, the freedom and flexibility to use virtually any music you want – legally, ethically, and easily. Without SOCAN, you would have to get permission and negotiate a royalty with every songwriter, lyricist, and music publisher whose work you intend to play, or to have publicly performed. Instead, SOCAN simplifies the process by allowing businesses to pay a relatively small fee, often once a year to play all the music their customers enjoy hearing. These fees are then distributed as royalties to music creators in Canada and around the world, through reciprocal agreements with similar music rights organizations in other countries. To learn more about our Licensed To Play program, visit our Music Users page.

Grimes
Member

Grimes

In 2015 year-end “Best-Of” lists, SOCAN member Grimes was in the top three in Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Billboard, and The New York Times, among others. A fiercely independent artist, Grimes has achieved such success without compromise. She writes, records and produces all of her own music, which ranges from the sweetest radio pop, to industrial bombast, to cranking electro beats. She designs her own album art, directs her own videos, and has created her own perfume. Equally at home at Comic-Con or on a modelling runway, this DIY renaissance woman has become the patron saint of millennials worldwide.